Congregational kiddish

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Congregational kiddish

Postby Sander » Sun Sep 05, 2010 7:57 am

I attend a kiddush after musaf on Shabbat, and a group of people are getting together as donors to provide funds for something a little more special on the shabbat before Rosh Hodesh.

My question is, how does supporting a public kiddush compare, as a mitzva, to giving money to charities such as donations to buy food for people? Is it reasonable for me to choose to support kiddush, when that money might have been donated help poor people?
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Re: Congregational kiddish

Postby Enora » Sun Sep 05, 2010 9:34 pm

I attend a kiddush after musaf on Shabbat, and a group of people are getting together as donors to provide funds for something a little more special on the shabbat before Rosh Hodesh.

My question is, how does supporting a public kiddush compare, as a mitzva, to giving money to charities such as donations to buy food for people? Is it reasonable for me to choose to support kiddush, when that money might have been donated help poor people?


I don't know what kind of crowd is in your shul. In mine (here in Morocco and in Paris), public seudot gather a lot of people.... much more then the regulars you see on every other shabbat.
We get a lot of elderly poor people (mainly women) that are basically there for a free meal. Except they might not be the kind to accept charity.
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Re: Congregational kiddish

Postby martinbrody » Mon Sep 06, 2010 2:34 am

Sander wrote:I attend a kiddush after musaf on Shabbat, and a group of people are getting together as donors to provide funds for something a little more special on the shabbat before Rosh Hodesh.

My question is, how does supporting a public kiddush compare, as a mitzva, to giving money to charities such as donations to buy food for people? Is it reasonable for me to choose to support kiddush, when that money might have been donated help poor people?



Providing kiddush is a big mitzvah and we have a special misheberach for those that do!
3rd paragraph of yikom porkon afyer the concluding blessings of the haftora.! (most people don't pay attention to the words!)

Best,
Martin B
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Re: Congregational kiddish

Postby Kira » Mon Sep 06, 2010 8:28 pm

Martin, that is for those who provide wine so that the community can make kiddush together, as a necessity, not as a luxury.

Sander, I really don't know. It's certainly a good thing to contribute to the community and to share the enjoyment of the holiday. I guess it would be similar to asking if it's better to give charity or buy an extra nice cut of meat for the holiday.

The Rambam does say that whoever makes a fancy Yom Tov meal and does not invite poor people (or give charity), shows that the holiday is nothing more than a feast for his belly, and has nothing to do with G-d.

Looks like the answer is to do both. Certainly not to use money ear-marked for charity for a community kiddush, unless your community really does host people who otherwise would not be eating.

BE"H, may you have the resources to do both, and may you continue to be among the givers and never the receivers.

-Kira
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Re: Congregational kiddish

Postby Sander » Tue Sep 07, 2010 3:47 am

Enora wrote: I don't know what kind of crowd is in your shul. In mine (here in Morocco and in Paris), public seudot gather a lot of people.... much more then the regulars you see on every other shabbat.
We get a lot of elderly poor people (mainly women) that are basically there for a free meal. Except they might not be the kind to accept charity.
You are right, Enora. What I have found is that if a congregation makes a kiddush regularly and reliably, so that people can count on the schedule, then people who really need the public kiddush will find out about it and show up.
I have noticed it is also very popular with kids and teens. My main motivation to attend is I like seeing the kids run around.
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Re: Congregational kiddish

Postby Enora » Tue Sep 07, 2010 11:26 am

No need for it to be regularly scheduled, just announced a few days ahead of time. When you're hungry, you know where it's at.
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Re: Congregational kiddish

Postby Sander » Thu Jan 20, 2011 6:20 am

Kira wrote:BE"H, may you have the resources to do both, and may you continue to be among the givers and never the receivers.

-Kira
It came true. I sponsored a kiddush coming up, in memory of my father. Now the rabbi asked me if I want him to say a few words for a minute or so, either in the shabbat morning or at shalosh seudot, to mention something about my father. I did not know what to answer, so I told the rabbi let me think about it. Do you have any opinion or suggestion, what kind of words might be appropriate? I feel that it might be good to say something but I can't think of what might be suitable in front of the people attending. None of them knew my father.
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Re: Congregational kiddish

Postby Kira » Thu Jan 20, 2011 10:56 am

If it's the rabbi speaking, what's the problem? Meet with him for a few minutes, tell him some stories about your father, and all will be well.

Recently, at the place where I learn, one of the administrators asked to dedicate the class to her father's memory for his yahrtzeit. The teacher asked her to say a few words. On the spot, she did, just one sentence about how he had always loved Israel but could not manage to make aliya but all his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren live in Israel. I've never met the gentleman, but this was enough to make it meaningful.

May your father's memory be a blessing,

-Kira
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Re: Congregational kiddish

Postby Sander » Fri Feb 04, 2011 2:47 am

What I decided, was that I rather not have anything specific said in the shul on shabbat. It would make it seem like a eulogy, and I did not think that is a good thing to do on shabbat.

Instead, I wrote a few words and they were put in at the bottom of the weekly bulletin. The weekly bulletin is an single page, that people look at to see the times of the minyan and candle lighting, and general announcements.

At the kiddish itself, the rabbi announced my father's name, that it was in memory of him, and that is all.

I thought it was very dignified and I was full of emotion. People were very kind and came to thank me and wish my father an aliya neshama.
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Re: Congregational kiddish

Postby rivka » Fri Feb 04, 2011 4:16 am

That sounds very appropriate.
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