The written law mentions oral law.

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The written law mentions oral law.

Postby Sander » Fri Feb 04, 2011 3:07 am

In Shemot chapter 25:
8. And they shall make Me a sanctuary and I will dwell in their midst
9. according to all that I show you, the pattern of the Mishkan and the pattern of all its vessels; and so shall you do.
As the written law does not have pictures, the statement "according to all that I show you" refers to instructions that are not in the written law. This is one of several instances where the written law explicitly makes reference to oral law.
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Re: The written law mentions oral law.

Postby Kira » Sun Feb 06, 2011 3:02 pm

Thank you, I'll need to make use of this soon.

-Kira
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Re: The written law mentions oral law.

Postby Poster » Mon Feb 21, 2011 5:31 pm

The penalty for violating Shabbos is written, death.


OK, how do you violate Shabbos? Which verses spell that out? Wouldn't it be nice to know *before* your trial?

Deut 1:
16 And I charged your judges at that time, “Hear the disputes between your people and judge fairly, whether the case is between two Israelites or between an Israelite and a foreigner residing among you.


So if there's any question regarding anything, if you're in a debate or dispute, take it to the judges, charged by G-d.

If you are defending against a Christian missionary, important to read Mat 23, where J tells you to do what the rabbis say to do, and then he is critical of them, but at least read it because it ties their hands to some extent.


Free audio, two lectures on the Oral law from Rabbi Singer:

http://www.outreachjudaism.org/biblical.html

If it is a Christian attack, be sure to tell them how much you love them.
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Re: The written law mentions oral law.

Postby Sander » Fri Feb 25, 2011 3:26 am

People who don't keep shabbat, in my opinion their lives are missing something so essential, that it is as if they were not alive.

Whatever keeping shabbat meant to society 3000 years ago, it means so much more in modern times. Three thousand years ago the problems of shabbat were how to keep your fire going, and what to eat. They had no refrigerator with a light inside that goes on when you open the door. Three thousand years ago there was no movie theater, no golf club, no pizza in 30 minutes or its free.

Shabbat is an island of sanity, where I can sit in peace with the people I love. That is a good life.
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Re: The written law mentions oral law.

Postby rivka » Fri Feb 25, 2011 4:33 am

Sander wrote:Shabbat is an island of sanity, where I can sit in peace with the people I love.

Well said.
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Re: The written law mentions oral law.

Postby Enora » Fri Feb 25, 2011 11:16 am

Sander wrote:People who don't keep shabbat, in my opinion their lives are missing something so essential, that it is as if they were not alive.

Whatever keeping shabbat meant to society 3000 years ago, it means so much more in modern times. Three thousand years ago the problems of shabbat were how to keep your fire going, and what to eat. They had no refrigerator with a light inside that goes on when you open the door. Three thousand years ago there was no movie theater, no golf club, no pizza in 30 minutes or its free.

Shabbat is an island of sanity, where I can sit in peace with the people I love. That is a good life.


I completely agree!!! I can't stand it when people tell me "yeah I can understand 3000 years ago but we're in modern times now... cars didn't exist!". Not only do I not get the logic to such reasoning, how does more sophisticated technology make shabbat "passé"? On top of that, if anything, modern technology makes keeping shabbat EASIER then 3000 yrs ago (think of timers, hotplates, daf cooks (electric crock pots)). All the "rest" (mobile phones, computers, shopping, cars etc) are things that humanity CANNOT live without for 1 day/week without being considered archaic? I don't get it. If anything it's ecological!
Why is it so hard to imagine NOT answering your phone, NOT watching tv, not using the computer,not driving etc? Bunch of slaves.
Shabbat is an act of freedom
Shabbat shalom!
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Re: The written law mentions oral law.

Postby rivka » Fri Feb 25, 2011 4:47 pm

There's actually a small but growing movement (I think mostly in the US) of taking a few hours or a day of "unplugging". They call it various things (the secular Jewish groups refer to it as a sabbath; most of the other groups I've heard of similar things with call it other things), and the details of what the suggested guidelines are vary (6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, etc.)

The first time I heard about one of them, I laughed.

National Unplugging Day
http://www.sabbathmanifesto.org/unplug/
Even celebrities are doing it! ;)
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Re: The written law mentions oral law.

Postby Hart60 » Sun Feb 27, 2011 4:13 pm

Poster wrote: If you are defending against a Christian missionary, important to read Mat 23, where J tells you to do what the rabbis say to do, and then he is critical of them, but at least read it because it ties their hands to some extent.

It could be taken as a pop against the Christian Church today, I wonder why they don't take it as that ?
Poster wrote: If it is a Christian attack, be sure to tell them how much you love them.

And if it's a JW ? :lol:

Dan.
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Re: The written law mentions oral law.

Postby Hart60 » Sun Feb 27, 2011 4:18 pm

Sander wrote:People who don't keep shabbat, in my opinion their lives are missing something so essential, that it is as if they were not alive.
Shabbat is an island of sanity, where I can sit in peace with the people I love. That is a good life.

Even as a Gentile,I can identify with both of those statements .

Dan.
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Re: The written law mentions oral law.

Postby Poster » Tue Mar 01, 2011 4:05 am

Hart60 wrote:
Poster wrote: If you are defending against a Christian missionary, important to read Mat 23, where J tells you to do what the rabbis say to do, and then he is critical of them, but at least read it because it ties their hands to some extent.

It could be taken as a pop against the Christian Church today, I wonder why they don't take it as that ?


He critiques larger sized t'fillin and rabbinic laws. I believe Rav Ya'akov Emden argues that proves J was an Orthodox Jew of the House of Hillel who was critiquing Bais Shammai's conservative rabbinic laws. Of course, J isn't seen that way at all in modern times, nor do I particularly care what the man had to say, except that his quotes can be used to disprove those who argue that he claimed other than his quotes. For instance, the man can't be found to be saying he's G-d. 'Son of G-d' means regular human beings in the Jewish language / bible. Romans, on the other hand, held the phrase to mean that a god raped a human woman and had a child from that rape. (Julius Caesar - claimed to be a son of a god, and thus was murdered just 30 years prior to J and so the Romans were hyper about anyone using that idea, 'son of god'. The Republic was paranoid at the moment, justifiably so, given the next few hundred years of Roman emperors waiting to become sons of gods. Ever heard of the Holy Roman Empire? Well, the empire of sons of gods became what religion? Christianity. The confusion of the term was never corrected.



Due to the nature of my post, moderators are welcomed to edit at will.
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